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Israeli, Australian, New Zealand leaders mark Beersheba battle centennial

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull (C), Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R), and New Zealand Governor General Patsy Reddy (L) lay wreaths during a ceremony in the British Cemetery in Beersheba on October 31, 2017
JIM HOLLANDER (POOL/AFP)
Netanyahu hailed the battle as eventually helping lead to the creation of the state of Israel

Israeli, Australian and New Zealand leaders gathered in southern Israel on Tuesday to mark the 100th anniversary of a key cavalry charge that helped clear the way to Jerusalem during World War I.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was joined by his Australian counterpart Malcolm Turnbull and New Zealand Governor-General Patsy Reddy in Beersheba, where the Australia and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) defeated Ottoman troops to gain control of a strategic crossroads.

The ceremony began with a prayer and speeches during which Netanyahu hailed the battle as eventually helping lead to the creation of the state of Israel.

"Nearly 4,000 years ago Abraham came to Beersheba, the city of seven wells," Netanyahu said at the ceremony, held in the city's Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery.

"Exactly 100 years ago brave ANZAC soldiers liberated Beersheba for the sons and daughters of Abraham and opened the gateway for the Jewish people to reenter the stage of history," Netanyahu said.

JIM HOLLANDER (POOL/AFP)

"Israel salutes the sacrifice of these brave soldiers. We will never forget them. We will forever honor and treasure their memory."

To Australians, "the battle has become part of our history, part of our psyche," Turnbull said.

The audacious assault on entrenched Ottoman forces enabled the British advance into Palestine and "secured the victory that did not create the state of Israel, but enabled its creation," Turnbull said.

"Had the Ottoman rule in Palestine and Syria not been overthrown by the Australians and the New Zealanders, the Balfour Declaration would have been empty words," the Australian premier said.

Eli Sabti

Britain's Balfour Declaration on November 2, 1917 said it viewed "with favor the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people".

New Zealand's Reddy said the battle "changed political conditions in this region in the most profound way".

Later in the morning a memorial museum was dedicated in honor of the Australia and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) forces.

- 'That's pretty special' -

The historic battle will also be marked with a 100-horse parade in Beersheba by volunteer Australian riders in period uniform and a reenactment of the charge.

Organizers said 3,000 tourists from Australia and New Zealand came for the ceremonies, which saw the normally tranquil Beersheba, dubbed the capital of the Negev desert region, astir with dignitaries, security forces and media.

MENAHEM KAHANA (AFP)

Kindergarteners holding small plastic Israeli flags were led into the ceremonies by chipper teachers, as teenagers in white shirts waited to pass security to enter the dedication of the nearby ANZAC museum.

New Zealander Tim Moore was visiting as part of a group of 200 people, some of them riding in the march.

The 65-year-old sheep and cattle farmer's grandfather had participated in the Palestine campaign, and Moore had replicated a picture his grandfather took at the train station in Amman before arriving in Israel.

"That's pretty special," he said.

See also:

The ‘Berserk Gallop’ in Beersheba which opened the way to Jerusalem

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