Ethiopia warring parties agree to truce

AFP

3 min read
Redwan Hussien Rameto (L), representative of the Ethiopian government, and Getachew Reda (R), representative of the Tigray People's Liberation Front, shake hands on a peace agreement between the two parties in Pretoria, South Africa, on November 2, 2022.
PHILL MAGAKOE / AFPRedwan Hussien Rameto (L), representative of the Ethiopian government, and Getachew Reda (R), representative of the Tigray People's Liberation Front, shake hands on a peace agreement between the two parties in Pretoria, South Africa, on November 2, 2022.

African Union envoy Olusegun Obasanjo hails the agreement as a new 'dawn' for Ethiopia

Warring sides in the brutal two-year conflict in Ethiopia's Tigray agreed to a truce, the African Union's mediator said Wednesday following marathon talks in South Africa.

"The two parties in the Ethiopian conflict have formally agreed to the cessation of hostilities as well as the systematic, orderly, smooth and coordinated disarmament," former Nigerian president Olusegun Obasanjo said, hailing the deal as marking a new “dawn” for Ethiopia.

The week-long talks were the first formal dialogue for ending a war that has killed hundreds of thousands and unleashed a humanitarian crisis.

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Tigray's rebels hailed the agreement, noting that Ethiopia agreed to “enhance” cooperation with aid agencies.

"In order to address the pains of our people, we have made concessions because we have to build trust,” said the head of their delegation, Getachew Reda.

"Ultimately, the fact that we have reached a point where we have now signed an agreement speaks volumes about the readiness on the part of the two sides to lay the past behind them to chart a new path of peace," said Reda. 

The conflict erupted on November 4, 2020, when Addis Ababa sent troops into Tigray after accusing the TPLF, the regional ruling party, of attacking federal army camps.

Talks were scheduled to run until Sunday, but they were extended.

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