Biden speaks of 'urgent' crisis as he joins UN climate talks

AFP

3 min read
US President Joe Biden delivers a speech during the COP27 summit in Egypt's Red Sea resort city of Sharm el-Sheikh.
AHMAD GHARABLI / AFPUS President Joe Biden delivers a speech during the COP27 summit in Egypt's Red Sea resort city of Sharm el-Sheikh.

Climate action in the United States was significantly boosted this year when Congress passed a spending bill

U.S. President Joe Biden arrived at UN climate talks in Egypt on Friday armed with significant domestic achievements against global warming but under pressure to do more for countries reeling from natural disasters.

Biden will spend only a few hours at COP27 in Sharm el-Sheikh, three days after U.S. midterm elections that have raised questions about what the result could mean for US climate policy.

The lightning visit to Egypt marks the start of a week-long trip abroad that will also take him to an ASEAN regional summit in Cambodia the weekend before he travels to Indonesia for G20 talks.

Climate action in the United States - the world's second-biggest emitter - was significantly boosted this year when Congress passed a landmark spending bill, the Inflation Reduction Act, which includes $369 billion for clean energy and climate initiatives.

Global warming "is an urgent crisis," Biden said as he met Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi on the sidelines of COP27, where he said he would address human rights in the country with his host.

SAUL LOEB / AFP
SAUL LOEB / AFPEgyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi and his US counterpart Joe Biden hold a meeting on the sidelines of the COP27 summit, in Egypt's Red Sea resort city of Sharm el-Sheikh, on November 11, 2022.

Biden, due to deliver a speech later, skipped a two-day summit of about 100 world leaders at COP27 that coincided with the U.S. election earlier this week.

New research shows just how dauntingly hard it will be to meet the goal of capping global warming at 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit above preindustrial levels - requiring emissions to be slashed nearly in half by 2030.

The new study - published on Friday in the Earth System Science Data - found that CO2 emissions from fossil fuels are on track to rise one percent in 2022 to reach an all-time high.

COP27 talks have been dominated by the need for wealthy polluters to stop stalling on helping developing countries green their economies and prepare for future impacts - alongside calls to provide financial help for the catastrophic damage already apparent.

This article received 0 comments