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Taiwan seeking self defense, not ‘military confrontation’

i24NEWS

clock 2 min read

Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen speaks at a navy base in Yilan, Taiwan on September 9, 2021.
Sam Yeh/AFPTaiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen speaks at a navy base in Yilan, Taiwan on September 9, 2021.

President Tsai also touched on the importance of allies during times of tension

President Tsai Ing-wen said on Wednesday that although Taiwan was not looking for a military confrontation, it would take measures to defend itself.

“Taiwan does not seek military confrontation,” Tsai explained at a Taipei security forum.

“It hopes for a peaceful, stable, predictable and mutually-beneficial coexistence with its neighbors. But Taiwan will also do whatever it takes to defend its freedom and democratic way of life.”

Tsai also touched on the importance of allies during times of tension, saying “Taiwan is fully committed to collaborating with regional players to prevent armed conflict in the East China, South China Seas and in the Taiwan Strait.”

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Those regional allies include Australia -- the country’s former prime minister Tony Abbott spoke at the same security forum on the importance of a Canberra-Taipei partnership.

“It is quite possible that Beijing could lash out disastrously quite soon,” he said.

“I don't believe Australia should be indifferent to the fate of a fellow democracy of almost 25 million people.”

Abbott’s remarks come amid reports in Reuters which say that one of Taiwan’s biggest allies, the United States, is sending special forces to train the island’s military.

The region has been relatively quiet since a recent incident where Beijing deployed its largest aircraft excursion to date into Taiwan’s air defense zone.

However, Taiwan is staying vigilant, with Premier Su Tseng-chang urging the island to “be on alert.”