UN confirms Arctic town hit record 100°F heat in 2020

i24NEWS - Reuters

3 min read
Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Petteri Taalas gestures at the United Nations offices in Geneva, Switzerland, on October 5, 2021.
Fabrice Coffrini/AFPSecretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Petteri Taalas gestures at the United Nations offices in Geneva, Switzerland, on October 5, 2021.

The Arctic Circle is warming at a rate over two times that of the worldwide average

A United Nations agency confirmed Tuesday that a town located in the Arctic Circle reached a record-breaking heat of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit in 2020, prompting alarm over climate change.

Verkhoyansk, a town in Russia located 71 miles north of the Arctic Circle, first recorded the unprecedented temperature on June 20 of last year.

The measurement was later verified by the UN’s climate agency, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and recorded in the World Weather & Climate Extremes Archive, a collection of notable extreme climatology events.

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“It is possible, indeed likely, that greater extremes will occur in the Arctic region in the future,” the organization cautioned in a statement.

The Arctic Circle is warming at a rate over two times that of the worldwide average, and 2020 marked one of the three hottest years recorded by the UN agency.

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Scientists predict climate change will bring more regular occurrences of extreme weather and climate events throughout the world, and note that the Middle East is particularly vulnerable to such shifts.

“By the end of the century, about half of the (region’s) population (approximately 600 million) could be exposed to annually recurring super- and ultra-extreme heat waves,” a study published in the UK scientific journal Nature in March 2021 said.

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