Northern Ireland marks 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday

i24NEWS - AFP

3 min read
Flowers are placed at a memorial engraved with the names of those who died during the 1972 Bloody Sunday killings, in the Bogside area of ​​Londonderry, Northern Ireland on January 29, 2022.
PAUL FAITH / AFPFlowers are placed at a memorial engraved with the names of those who died during the 1972 Bloody Sunday killings, in the Bogside area of ​​Londonderry, Northern Ireland on January 29, 2022.

British troops shot 26 unarmed civilians, killing 13, with another later dying from his wounds

The Northern Irish city of Londonderry commemorates one of the darkest days in modern UK history on Sunday when, 50 years ago, British paratroopers opened fire without provocation on civil rights protesters.

The anniversary of "Bloody Sunday" comes with Northern Ireland's fragile peace destabilized by Brexit, and with families of the victims despondent over whether the soldiers involved will ever face trial.

https://twitter.com/i/web/status/1487626485288431617 ...

This post can't be displayed because social networks cookies have been deactivated. You can activate them by clicking .

Charlie Nash saw his 19-year-old cousin William Nash killed by one of more than 100 high-velocity rounds fired by members of the British Parachute Regiment on January 30, 1972.

"We thought there might be rioting, but nothing, nothing like what happened. We thought at first they were rubber bullets," Nash, now 73, told AFP.

"But then we saw Hugh Gilmour (one of six 17-year-old victims) lying dead. We couldn't take it in. Everyone was running," he said.

"It's important for the rest of the world to see what they did to us that day. But will we ever see justice? Never, especially not from Boris Johnson."

https://twitter.com/i/web/status/1487483115526361101 ...

This post can't be displayed because social networks cookies have been deactivated. You can activate them by clicking .

The UK prime minister this week called Bloody Sunday a "tragic day in our history". But his government is pushing legislation that critics say amounts to an amnesty for all killings during Northern Ireland's three decades of sectarian unrest, including by security forces.

Thirteen protesters died on Bloody Sunday, when the paratroopers opened fire through narrow streets and across open wasteland.

For decades figures within the UK government and army equivocated on whether British soldiers opened fire on unarmed civilians without justification. In 2010, almost 40 years after the killings, then prime minister David Cameron accepted the state's responsibility for the murders, apologizing to victims.

The incident acted as a turning point for Catholic Republicans who wished to secede from the United Kingdom, diminishing those that sought non-violent means and driving recruitment to groups which sought armed conflict with London. 

This article received 0 comments