Memorial trees at Buchenwald concentration camp vandalized twice in a week

i24NEWS - AFP

2 min read
Poland's Minister of Foreign Affairs Zbigniew Rau (L) with his German and French counterparts Heiko Maas and Jean-Yves Le Drian (R) plant a tree on the memorial path of Buchenwald nazi concentration camp in Weimar, Germany, on September 10, 2021.
JENS SCHLUETER / POOL / AFPPoland's Minister of Foreign Affairs Zbigniew Rau (L) with his German and French counterparts Heiko Maas and Jean-Yves Le Drian (R) plant a tree on the memorial path of Buchenwald nazi concentration camp in Weimar, Germany, on September 10, 2021.

'Those who commit such cowardly attacks share a mentality with the murderers in the concentration camps'

Seven trees planted near the former Nazi concentraion camp Buchenwald in honour of its victims were damaged by vandals twice in the last week, with local authorities on Monday pledging a “decisive response.”

"Buchenwald" in German means beech forest. The trees, which were destroyed by vandals last week and over the weekend, were planted there as part of the project “1,000 beeches” initiated by the Lebenshilfewerk organization in 1999 to commemorate those who died in the “death march” route to the camp. 

The camp memorial is located in the German state of Thuringia. The state premier Bobo Ramelow interrupted his summer holiday in response to the incidents and told local media that he would attend a memorial march for reported Jewish youth in the city of Weimar on Sunday. 

"The only thing that will help is a decisive response. Two new trees for every destroyed one. Redoubled focus on every cowardly act," he was quoted as saying by AFP.

"Those who commit such cowardly attacks share a mentality with the murderers in the concentration camps," Ramelow added, pledging to take part in the planting of new trees.

Video poster

Over 56,000 people, including thousands of Jews, died at Buchenwald during World War II. American forces liberated the camp in 1945.

Earlier in June, a German court sentenced a 101-year-old former concentration camp guard to five years in prison, making him the oldest person to be put on trial for the crimes committed during the Holocaust. Josef Schuetz was found guilty of being involved in the murders of 3,518 prisoners at the Sachsenhausen camp in Oranienburg, north of Berlin, between 1942 and 1945.

 

This article received 0 comments