Google honors Jewish diarist Anne Frank with site animation

i24NEWS

3 min read
A screenshot of Google's animation slideshow honoring Anne Frank, taken on June 25, 2022.
Google DoodlesA screenshot of Google's animation slideshow honoring Anne Frank, taken on June 25, 2022.

Anne Frank is one of the 60 leading search topics on Google relating to Jewish culture

To mark the 75th anniversary of the publication of Anne Frank’s diary, Google honored the Holocaust victim with a slideshow animation of moments of her life that she documented.

The doodles were launched in over 25 countries – including the United States, Germany, and Britain – and also commemorated the Jewish diarist’s would-have-been 93rd birthday earlier this month, according to Israel Hayom.

Scenes depicted on the Google homepage were illustrated based on Frank’s own description of life events, and drew inspiration from the layered collage style featured in her diary.

German illustrator Thoka Maer, Google Doodle art director who created the drawings, said it was her way of showing responsibility and keeping the memory of the Holocaust, as well as its victims, alive.

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Google further honored the Jewish diarist by revealing search trends for Anne Frank worldwide.

According to Google Trends statistics, searches about Frank on the platform peaked in February 2022 when Netflix released “My Best Friend Anne Frank,” a drama film based on the real-life relationship between Frank and Hannah Goslar.

Stats also showed that Anne Frank is one of the 60 leading search topics relating to Jewish culture.

Video poster

Anne Frank, born in Germany, emigrated to Amsterdam soon after the Nazi regime rose to power in 1933. When Nazi Germany invaded the Netherlands in 1940 – followed by the persecution and segregation of Dutch Jews – Frank and her family went into hiding, during which time she jotted down her experiences. 

Five years later, Frank died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in what is today Lower Saxony in northern Germany, with evidence suggesting that she fell victim to the typhus epidemic that left 17,000 Jews dead.

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