Israel: Netanyahu criticizes Lapid’s UN speech ‘full of weakness, defeat’

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Benjamin Netanyahu casts his vote in the Likud primaries, at a polling station in Tel Aviv, Israel, on August 10, 2022.
Tomer Neuberg/Flash90Benjamin Netanyahu casts his vote in the Likud primaries, at a polling station in Tel Aviv, Israel, on August 10, 2022.

'Lapid endangers our future and our existence both on the Palestinian issue and on the Iranian issue'

Opposition Leader Benjamin Netanyahu responded to Israeli Prime Minister Yair Lapid’s speech at the United Nations General Assembly on Thursday accusing him of “endangering” Israel’s future. 

Lapid told the UN that he supports the two-state solution on condition that the Palestinian side will commit to creating a “peaceful state” that will not threaten Israel’s security with terrorist attacks by Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad. 

"Tonight we heard a speech full of weakness, defeat and bowing of the head. After the right-wing government led by me removed the Palestinian state from the world agenda, after we brought four historic peace agreements with Arab countries that bypassed the Palestinian veto, Lapid is bringing the Palestinians back to the forefront of the world stage and putting Israel right into the Palestinian hole,” Netanyahu said. 

The former Israeli prime minister and leader of the right-wing Likud party stressed that he and his allies “will not allow this.”

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He also condemned Lapid’s position on the Iranian nuclear threat that the prime minister also addressed during his UN speech. 

“Lapid endangers our future and our existence both on the Palestinian issue and on the Iranian issue. While Iran rushes to a nuclear agreement that endangers the very existence of the State of Israel, Lapid does nothing,” Netanyahu claimed. 

Lapid's statements about the two-state solution that have already triggered a wide response among Israeli politicians come shortly before the November elections where Netanyahu's bloc is predicted to win 60 seats in the 120-seat Knesset (Israeli parliament) — falling short of just one to secure the majority necessary to form a government. 

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