Syria: Journalist talks daily life in Kurdish-ruled Rojava

i24NEWS

2 min read
Syrian journalist Liza Shishko speaks with i24NEWS from Derik, Syria, on January 2, 2021.
i24NEWSSyrian journalist Liza Shishko speaks with i24NEWS from Derik, Syria, on January 2, 2021.

The journalist says 'No one can count anymore on (the) United States, like it was before'

Syrian journalist Liza Shishko spoke with i24NEWS Sunday about daily life in Rojava, a Kurdish-controlled region in northern Syria.

“Now we are in the process of restoring life… Bomb shelters and tunnels are being built both for civil society and for military.”

She said that northern Syria relies more on itself now, in addition to its relations with the United States and Russia.

“Much has become clear, in recent years, that… no one can count anymore on (the) United States, like it was before, you know, in 2019,” Shishko said, adding “Now we consider the Russian role in this region bigger than before.”

The journalist also explained that daily life was even more stressful now due to the impact of the economic crisis, and the Covid pandemic.

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“Of course people are afraid of a new war, but (the) economical crisis impacts more nowadays,” Shishko told i24NEWS.

She said that the female Kurdish fighters who fought IS are still expected to play a big role in the defense of the region.

“Women’s self defense units are still at the front line, and they exist, and they for sure will participate in new battles, new operations, if the war will start again with Turkey.”

While the presence of IS in the area diminished from large-scale fighting to sleeper cells active in southern regions, Shishko explained that they are still very dangerous.

The journalist said though the US still conducts some operations against IS with the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), raids on the militants are now mostly managed by Russia, a local unit, and the SDF.