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UN: Death toll from Yemen war will reach 377,000 people by 2022

AFP

clock 3 min read

Fighters loyal to Yemen's Saudi-backed government drive near al-Jawba frontline in the village of Hays, near the conflict zone in Yemen's western province of Hodeida, on November 21, 2021.
KHALED ZIAD / AFPFighters loyal to Yemen's Saudi-backed government drive near al-Jawba frontline in the village of Hays, near the conflict zone in Yemen's western province of Hodeida, on November 21, 2021.

Nearly 60 percent of deaths caused by indirect impacts such as lack of safe water, hunger, and disease

Yemen's seven-year-old war will claim 377,000 lives by the end of the year, through both direct and indirect impacts, a United Nations agency estimated in a report published Tuesday.  

Nearly 60 percent of deaths will be caused by indirect impacts such as lack of safe water, hunger, and disease, the report said, suggesting that fighting will directly kill over 150,000 people. 

Most of those killed by the war's indirect effects will be "young children who are especially vulnerable to under- and malnutrition," said the UN Development Programme report.

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"In 2021, a Yemeni child under the age of five dies every nine minutes because of the conflict," it found.

A Saudi-led coalition intervened in Yemen in early 2015 to shore up the government after Iran-backed Houthi fighters seized the capital Sana’a months before.

Fighting since then has had "catastrophic effects on the nation's development," said the report.

The UNDP warned that the war in Yemen, already the poorest country in the region, has thrown its development back by over two decades, and is often labeled the greatest humanitarian disaster in the world.

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Projecting the impact of continued fighting into the future, the UNDP claimed that 1.3 million people in total will die by 2030.

"A growing proportion of those deaths will occur... due to second-order impacts that the crisis is waging on livelihoods, food prices and the deterioration of basic services such as health and education."