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'Unprecedented data' in new AstraZeneca breast cancer drug

i24NEWS

clock 2 min read

A logo is pictured on a wall outside the offices of pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca in Macclesfield, central England on May 11, 2021.
Paul Ellis/AFPA logo is pictured on a wall outside the offices of pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca in Macclesfield, central England on May 11, 2021.

Enhertu could become the breast cancer treatment of choice, company representatives hope

Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca on Sunday reported "groundbreaking" results for a new breast cancer drug.

The medication was found to reduce the risk of death or disease progression by 72 percent when analyzed in comparison to today's conventional treatments.

Enherthu, when combined with chemotherapy, was shown to be twice as effective in controlling disease progression as the standard intravenous antibody drug TDM1, which is the industry's current medication of choice.

"This unprecedented data represents a potential paradigm shift in the treatment of HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer, and illustrate the potential for Enhertu to transform more patient lives in earlier treatment settings," said Susan Galbraith, Executive Vice President of Research and Development in Oncology at AstraZeneca.

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of Enhertu in 2019 for inoperable or metastatic HER-2-positive breast cancer in cases where a single approach or combination of at least two other conventional treatments is deemed insufficient. 

AstraZeneca Vice President Dr. Sunil Verma expressed hope to ABC News that Enhertu could one day become the future first choice of care providers everywhere.

"With the remarkable results of this study, Enhertu might become the new standard of care treatment for patients with HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer following standard chemotherapy." 

In the United States, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, according to Breastcancer.org, and impacts thousands of patients every year.