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Israel's WaterGen aims to quench global thirst for clean drinking water

Israeli innovators Watergen have developed a new means of drawing water from the air through a process that condenses water molecules in humid air and converts them into clean drinking water.
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Watergen president Dr. Mikhael Mirilashvili tells i24NEWS his company stands ready to aid Gaza water crisis

According to biblical tradition, Moses struck the rock and water flowed from it. Today, as the global water insecurity worsens and the world looks for innovative solutions to keep people and crops hydrated, one Israeli company is looking to do even better.

Some one billion people worldwide lack access to safe water at home and another 4.5 billion lack proper sanitation. And this problem is growing.

Israeli innovators WaterGen have developed a new means of drawing water from the air through a process that condenses water molecules in humid air and converts them into clean drinking water. While the company is not the first to use this technology, they claim they are the first to make the process efficient enough for the mass market.

"Compared to us other companies are not effective," WaterGen president Dr. Mikhael Mirilashvili tells i24NEWS. "With this technology we are ten times more efficient than our competitors."

The Russian-Israeli billionaire who bought WaterGen in 2014 aims to taking the company international and is hoping to use the water tech not only to quench global thirst, but as a means of influencing relations in a region crying out for a clean drinking source.

"Our company can influence the economy of any country. Firstly there is no need for logistics and Co2 emissions, less plastic and most importantly clean water, which influences people’s health," he says.

Mirilashvili said that UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu even discussed how his company's technology could help solve a severe water crisis in the Gaza Strip.

"They were ready to support it but unfortunately this is not possible because of instability in the territory," Mirilashvili said.

Mirilashvili said that if the the situation became less volatile WaterGen would be ready to help.

"If Gaza calms down, we will be happy to help, even if they are launching rockets at us. And we can solve this problem not only in Gaza or Israel, also throughout the world," he said.

Often touted by Netanyahu, WaterGen’s technology was listed by the Ministry of Economy and Industry as one of Israel’s all-time top nine innovations.

"Such recognition for WaterGen is well deserved as it is a unique technology that changes the world, saves thousands of lives and will change millions – this is our aim," Mirilashvili says.

Whether Mirilashvili’s vision will come true, it is certain that innovations like this are critical if humanity is going to make it in through the 21st century.

Asher Westropp-Evans is i24NEWS’ Economy correspondent.

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